The Four Corners in Japan

The Four Corners in Japan

Amy Ella Blanchard

Classics / Childrens / Fiction

"I feel a migratory fever stirring within my veins," remarked Miss Helen Corner one morning as she sat with the elder two of her nieces in their Virginia home.Nan put down the book she was reading; Mary Lee looked up from her embroidery. "You are not going to desert us, Aunt Helen?" said Nan."Not unless you girls will join me in my flight.""But where would you fly?" asked Mary Lee."What do you say to Japan?""Japan? Oh, Aunt Helen, not really.""Why not? Every one goes there these days. We could make the trip by way of California, stop off for a few days at Honolulu, and see some of the strange things I have been reading about this winter. I am strongly inclined to make the trip if you two will go with me."
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The Four Corners Abroad

The Four Corners Abroad

Amy Ella Blanchard

Classics / Childrens / Fiction

The Corner SeriesTHE FOUR CORNERS ABROAD By AMY E. BLANCHARDCONTENTSThe Fourth in ParisThe Day of BastilleHousekeepingA Glimpse of SpainA FiestaSpanish HospitalityAcross the ChannelIn London TownWorkA Night AdventureSettling DownAll SaintsThe Fairy Play and Its Consequences"Stille Nacht"In the MountainsHerr Green-CapGood-bye MunichJack as ChampionA Youthful GuideToward the ToeILLUSTRATIONSJean with a pigeon on each shoulder was perfectly happyNan volunteered to go for suppliesMary Lee was snapping her fingers and taking her stepsJo managed to get next to the driverThe children stood in awe and delight at the KrippenCHAPTER I. THE FOURTH IN PARISIt was at Passy that a little party of American girls were discussing the afternoon\'s plans one day in July. The three older girls were most interested; the two younger were too much engrossed in a game of Diabolo to notice very much what the others were talking about."You see it\'s raining," said Nan Corner, a tall girl with dark hair, "so we can\'t go in the Bois as we intended.""Neither do we want to follow Aunt Helen\'s example and go hunting for antiques," put in Nan\'s sister, Mary Lee. "What do you say we do, Jo?"Jo Keyes was drumming on the window-pane and looking out at the rather unpromising weather. "I see an American flag, girls," she said. "Hail to you, Old Glory!—Goodness me!" She turned around. "Do you all know what day it is? Of course we must do something patriotic.""It\'s the Fourth of July!" exclaimed Nan, "and we never thought of it. For pity\'s sake! Isn\'t it ridiculous? We never made very much of it at home, but over here I feel so American when I remember Bunker Hill and Yorktown and our own Virginia Washington, that I could paint myself red, white and blue, and cry \'Give me liberty or give me death,\' from out the front window.""I beg you\'ll do no such thing," said Mary Lee, the literal.Nan laughed. The twins stopped their play and began to take an interest in what was being said. "Do paint your face red, white and blue and lean out the front window, Nan," said Jack; "it would be so funny.""Let Mary Lee do it," said Nan, putting her arm around her little sister; "she\'s already red, white and blue.""Let me see, Mary Lee, let me see," said Jack, eagerly.The others laughed. "Blue eyes, white nose, red lips," said Nan, touching with her finger these features of Mary Lee\'s."You fooled me," said Jack disgustedly. "I thought she might have lovely stripes or something on her face.""Foolish child," returned Nan, giving her a squeeze. "We must do something, girls, and look \'how it do rain,\' as Mitty would say.""Can\'t we have torpedoes or firecrackers or some kind of fireworks?" asked Jean."The gendarmes might come and rush us all off to the police court if we did," Jo told her. "They\'re so terribly particular here in Paris, that if a cab or an auto runs over you, you have to pay damages for getting in the way.""Thank heaven we\'re Americans," said Nan fervently. "I am more eager than ever to flaunt my colors. Of all unjust things I ever heard it is to run you down and make you pay for it. They needn\'t talk to me about their liberté, fraternité, and egalité. I\'ll give a centime to the first one who thinks a happy thought for celebrating, myself included."Jo was the first with a suggestion. "Let\'s have a tea and invite the grown-ups, your mother and Miss Helen. We might ask that nice Miss Joyce, too. We can have red, white and blue decorations and dress ourselves in the national colors, and it will be fine."
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A Sweet Little Maid

A Sweet Little Maid

Amy Ella Blanchard

Classics / Childrens / Fiction

Publisher: Hurst Publication date: 1899 Subjects: Readers Children\'s stories Computers / Programming Languages / General Fiction / General Juvenile Fiction / General Juvenile Fiction / Family / General Juvenile Fiction / Family / Parents Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there.
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A Dear Little Girls Summer Holidays

A Dear Little Girl's Summer Holidays

Amy Ella Blanchard

Classics / Childrens / Fiction

It was a very warm morning in June. Edna and her friend Dorothy Evans were sitting under the trees trying to keep cool. They both wore their thinnest morning frocks and had pinned their hair up in little pug knots on the tops of their heads. They had their boxes of pieces and were trying to make something suitable for their dolls to wear in the hot weather. "It\'s too sticky to sew," said Dorothy, throwing down her work. "Marguerite will have to go without a frock and sit around in her skin." "You mean in her kid," returned Edna. "Well, isn\'t kid skin?" asked Dorothy. Edna laughed. "Why, yes, I suppose it is, and Ben says we are kids, so our skin is kid skin. Oh, dear, it is hot. I wish I were a fish; it would be so nice to go slipping through the cool water." "Yes, but it wouldn\'t be so nice to be in a frying pan sizzling over a fire." "I feel almost as if I were doing that now. There comes the postman, I wonder if he has a letter from Jennie. We promised one another we would always write on blue paper because blue is true, you know, and that looks as if it might be a blue letter the postman has on top. I\'m going to see." "I\'ll wait here," returned Dorothy. "It\'s too hot to move." She sat fanning herself with the lid of her piece box, watching her friend the while. Once or twice Edna stopped on her way back, and finally she began to dance up and down, then ran toward Dorothy, calling out, "Oh, there\'s a lovely something to tell you. Oh, I do hope it can come true." "What is it?" cried Dorothy, roused out of her listlessness.
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