The Mystery Hunters at the Haunted Lodge

The Mystery Hunters at the Haunted Lodge

Capwell Wyckoff

Children's / Mystery / Christian

This book has been professionally retyped and reformatted to fit modern day standards by officials of the Portuguese Institute of Higher Studies in Geopolitics and Auxiliary Sciences. Albert Capwell Wyckoff was born on February 21, 1903, in New Jersey. His father, also named Albert Capwell Wyckoff, died when his son was young, an event that forced Capwell to go to work. He never finished high school, yet Capwell Wyckoff became a successful author of two and a half dozen children\'s novels. He also wrote for children\'s magazines, including Boys\' Life and The Open Road for Boys. Wyckoff is most well known for his series of mystery and adventure novels on the Mercer Boys, published in sixteen titles between 1921 and 1951. Interspersed among them were several other mystery novels, a perennially popular genre among children. Capwell Wyckoff wrote two stories for Weird Tales, "The Grappling Ghost" (July 1928) and "The Guillotine Club" (July 1929). Late in life, he wrote a number of Christian novels for children under the name Albert C. Wyckoff. He was well qualified, for Wyckoff served in the lay ministry in Arkansas before becoming ordained in the Presbyterian Church. He used the royalties from his books to pay for missionary work. For many years, Capwell Wyckoff lived and served in Kentucky, the place of his death on January 10, 1953. His headstone reads: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant." --This text refers to the Paperback edition. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
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The Mercer Boys on a Treasure Hunt

The Mercer Boys on a Treasure Hunt

Capwell Wyckoff

Children's / Mystery / Christian

“I’d like to have a crack at that ball,” said Don Mercer, with a grin. His brother Jim returned the grin as he said: “Let’s go out on the field and ask the kids to toss us one. They won’t mind giving us one swing at it.” The two Mercer brothers were standing at the edge of a large vacant lot near the center of their home town one morning late in June. They had been home from Woodcrest Military Institute for a week now on their summer vacation, and this particular day, having nothing more exciting to do, they had wandered around the town, coming at length to a familiar field where they had often played baseball. A number of youngsters were on the ground now, tossing and batting a discolored baseball, and the sight of them had caused the sandy haired, slightly freckled Don to express his wish. The two boys walked across the field toward the boys and Don said: “Wonder how much further I can hit it now than I could when I played here as a kid?” “Hard to tell,” returned Jim. “But we certainly got quite a bit of practise this spring at Woodcrest.”
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