The Corner House Girls Snowbound

The Corner House Girls Snowbound

Grace Brooks Hill

Childrens / Middle Grade

There was a vast amount of tramping up and down stairs, and little feet, well shod, are noisy. This padding up and down was by the two flights of back stairs from the entry off the kitchen porch to the big heated room that was called by the older folks who lived in the old Corner House, “the nursery.” “But it isn’t a nursery,” objected Dot Kenway, who really was not yet big enough to fit the name of “Dorothy.” “We never had a nurse, did we, Tess? Ruthie helped bring us up after our own truly mamma died. And, then, ‘nursery’ sounds so little.”
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  • 374
The Corner House Girls at School

The Corner House Girls at School

Grace Brooks Hill

Childrens / Middle Grade

A GOAT, FOUR GIRLS, AND A PIG When Sam Pinkney brought Billy Bumps over to the old Corner House, and tied him by the corner of the woodshed, there was at once a family conclave called. Sam was never known to be into anything but mischief; therefore when he gravely presented the wise looking old goat to Tess, suspicion was instantly aroused in the Kenway household that there was something beside good will behind Master Sam\'s gift. "Beware of the Greeks when they come bearing gifts," Agnes freely translated. "But you know very well, Aggie, Sammy Pinkney is not a Greek. He\'s Yankee—like us. That\'s a Greek man that sells flowers down on Main Street," said Tess, with gravity. "What I said is allegorical," pronounced Agnes, loftily. "We know Allie Neuman—Tess and me," ventured Dot, the youngest of the Corner House girls. "She lives on Willow Street beyond Mrs. Adams\' house, and she is going to be in my grade at school." "Oh, fine, Ruth!" cried Agnes, the twelve-year-old, suddenly seizing the eldest sister and dancing her about the big dining-room. "Won\'t it be just fine to get to school again?" "Fine for me," admitted Ruth, who had missed nearly two years of school attendance, and was now going to begin again in her proper grade at the Milton High School. "Eva Larry says we\'ll have the very nicest teacher there is—Miss Shipman. This is Eva\'s last year in grammar school, too, you know. We\'ll graduate together," said Agnes. Interested as Tess and Dot were in the prospect of attending school in Milton for the first time, just now they had run in to announce the arrival of Mr. Billy Bumps. "And a very suggestive name, I must say," said Ruth, reflectively. "I don\'t know about that Pinkney boy. Do you suppose he is playing a joke on you, Tess?" "Why, no!" cried the smaller girl. "How could he? For the goat\'s there." "Maybe that\'s the joke," suggested Agnes. "Well, we\'ll go and see him," said Ruth. "But there must be some reason beside good-will that prompted that boy to give you such a present." "I know," Dot said, solemnly. "What is it, Chicken-little?" demanded the oldest sister, pinching the little girl\'s cheek. "Their new minister," proclaimed Dot. "Their what?" gasped Agnes. "Who, dear?" asked Ruth. "Mrs. Pinkney\'s new minister. She goes to the Kaplan Chapel," said Dot, gravely, "and they got a new minister there. He came to call at Mrs. Pinkney\'s and the goat wasn\'t acquainted with him." "Oh-ho!" giggled Agnes. "Light on a dark subject." "Who told you, child?" asked Tess, rather doubtfully. "Holly Pease. And she said that Billy Bumps butted the new minister right through the cellar window—the coal window." "My goodness!" ejaculated Ruth. "Did it hurt him?" "They\'d just put in their winter\'s coal, and he went head first into that," said Dot. "So he didn\'t fall far. But he didn\'t dare go out of the house again until Sam came home after school and shut Billy up. Holly says Billy Bumps camped right outside the front door and kept the minister a prisoner." The older girls were convulsed with laughter at this tale, but Ruth repeated: "We might as well go and see him....
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  • 343

The Corner House Girls Growing Up

The Corner House Girls Growing Up

Grace Brooks Hill

Childrens / Middle Grade

It all began because Tess Kenway became suddenly and deeply interested in aeroplanes, airships and "all sort of flying things," as Dot, the smallest Corner House girl, declared. Perhaps one should modify that "suddenly"; for Tess had begun to think about flying—as a profession—as long ago as the winter before (and that was really a long time for a little girl of her age) when she had acted as Swiftwing the Hummingbird in the children's play of The Carnation Countess.
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  • 299
The Corner House Girls

The Corner House Girls

Grace Brooks Hill

Childrens / Middle Grade

“Look out, Dot! You’ll fall off that chair as sure as you live, child!” Tess was bustling and important. It was baking day in the Kenway household. She had the raisins to stone, and the smallest Kenway was climbing up to put the package of raisins back upon the cupboard shelf. There was going to be a cake for the morrow. Ruth was a-flour to her elbows, and Aggie was stirring the eggs till the beater was just “a-whiz.” Crash! Bang! Over went the chair; down came Dot; and the raisins scattered far and wide over the freshly scrubbed linoleum. Fortunately the little busy-body was not hurt. “What did I tell you?” demanded the raisin-seeder, after Ruth had made sure there were no broken bones, and only a “skinned” place on Dot’s wrist. “What did I tell you? You are such a careless child!”
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  • 198
The Corner House Girls Under Canvas

The Corner House Girls Under Canvas

Grace Brooks Hill

Childrens / Middle Grade

Leopold Classic Library is delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive collection. As part of our on-going commitment to delivering value to the reader, we have also provided you with a link to a website, where you may download a digital version of this work for free. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. Whilst the books in this collection have not been hand curated, an aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature. As a result of this book being first published many decades ago, it may have occasional imperfections. These imperfections may include poor picture quality, blurred or missing text. While some of these imperfections may have appeared in the original work, others may have resulted from the scanning process that has been applied. However, our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. While some publishers have applied optical character recognition (OCR), this approach has its own drawbacks, which include formatting errors, misspelt words, or the presence of inappropriate characters. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with an experience that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic book, and that the occasional imperfection that it might contain will not detract from the experience.
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