The Pride of Palomar

The Pride of Palomar

Peter B. Kyne

Business / Self Help

Peter B. Kyne (1880 – 1957) was an American novelist who wrote between 1904 and 1940. Many of his works were adapted into screenplays starting in the silent era, particularly his first novel, The Three Godfathers, which was published in 1913 and proved to be a huge success. He is credited in 110 films between 1914 and 1952. In this book: The Go-Getter The Pride of Palomar The Three Godfathers
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The Long Chance

The Long Chance

Peter B. Kyne

Business / Self Help

A story that is clean, powerful, romantic, exhilarating, filled with the sweep and breath of the snowy wastes of the North, filled with the lonely grandeur of the Painted Desert, and above all, filled with the deeds of strong men and women who have lived their lives under sun and wind and stars out in God’s Great Open. "Any desert land that will grow big sage will produce more fortunes thatn most gold mines -- if you can only get the water." A story fresh from the heart of the West, of San Pasqual, a sun-baked desert town, of Harley P. Hennage, the best gambler, the best and worst man of San Pasqual and of lovely Donna.
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  • 407
The Valley of the Giants

The Valley of the Giants

Peter B. Kyne

Business / Self Help

Set in the magnificent redwood forests of northern California, this is a tale of ruthless greed, corruption and misused power, in which businessman Howard Fallon is confronted by honest men, homesteaders as well as lumberjacks, who band together to defeat his plan to strip the territory of the giant trees. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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  • 307

Kindred of the Dust

Kindred of the Dust

Peter B. Kyne

Business / Self Help

1920. The novel begins: In the living-room of the Dreamerie, his home on Tyee Head, Hector McKaye, owner of the Tyee Lumber Company and familiarly known as The Laird, was wont to sit in his hours of leisure, smoking and building castles in Spain-for his son Donald. Here he planned the acquisition of more timber and the installation of an electric-light plant to furnish light, heat, and power to his own town of Port Agnew; ever and anon he would gaze through the plate-glass windows out to sea and watch for is ships to come home. Whenever The Laird put his dreams behind him, he always looked seaward. In the course of time, his home-bound skippers, sighting the white house on the headland and knowing that The Laird was apt to be up there watching, formed the habit of doing something that pleased their owner mightily. When the northwest trades held steady and true, and while the tide was still at the flood, they would scorn the services of the tug that went out to meet them and come ramping into the bight, all their white sails set and the glory of the sun upon them; as they swept past, far below The Laird, they would dip his house-flag-a burgee, scarlet-edged, with a fir tree embroidered in green on a field of white-the symbol to the world that here was a McKaye ship. And when the house-flag fluttered half-way to the deck and climbed again to the masthead, the soul of Hector McKaye would thrill. Due to the age and scarcity of the original we reproduced, some pages may be spotty or faded. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.
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