Four in Camp: A Story of Summer Adventures in the New Hampshire Woods

Four in Camp: A Story of Summer Adventures in the New Hampshire Woods

Ralph Henry Barbour

Children's Books / Romance

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to ensure edition identification: ++++ <title> Four In Camp: A Story Of Summer Adventures In The New Hampshire Woods; Big Four Series; Ralph Henry Barbour; May G. Quigley Collection<author> Ralph Henry Barbour<publisher> D. Appleton and company, 1909<subjects> Sports & Recreation; Camping; Camping; New Hampshire; Sports & Recreation / Camping
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Captain of the Crew

Captain of the Crew

Ralph Henry Barbour

Children's Books / Romance

fiction, American, action, sport, boy, victory, yachtINTRODUCTIONIn this, as in the two preceding volumes of the series—The Half-Back and For the Honor of the School—an attempt is made to show that athletics rightly indulged in is beneficial to the average boy and is an aid rather than a detriment to study. In it, too, as in the previous books, a plea is made for honesty and simplicity in sports. There is a tendency in this country to-day to give too great an importance to athletics—to take it much too seriously—and it is this tendency that should be guarded against, especially among school and college youths. When athletics ceases to be a pleasure and becomes a pursuit it should no longer have a place in school or college life.Many inquiries have been received as to whether Hillton Academy really exists. It doesn’t. It is, instead, a composite of several schools that the author knows of, and is not unlike any one of a half dozen institutions which are yearly turning out hundreds of honest, manly American boys, stronger, sturdier, and more self-reliant for just such trials and struggles as in the present volume fall to the lot of Dick Hope.To those readers who have followed the varying fortunes of Joel March, Outfield West, Wayne Gordon, and their companions, this book is gratefully dedicated byThe Author. Philadelphia, June 19, 1901.CONTENTSThe boy on the boxIntroducing Dick Hope’Is ’IghnessIn the gymThe indoor meetingThe relay raceTrevor’s victoryCandidates for the crewThe hockey matchBuying an ice-yachtAdventures of a bull pupMuggins is expelledThe voyage of the SleetDick tells his storyIn the rowing-roomA declaration of warIn the boatDick surrendersDefies the lawAnd extorts a promiseA disappointing heroTaylor accepts defeatProspects of victoryStewart’s revenge“Are you ready? Go!”At the mileAt the finishTrevor is comforted
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Full-Back Foster

Full-Back Foster

Ralph Henry Barbour

Children's Books / Romance

His name was Myron Warrenton Foster, and he came from Port Foster, Delaware. In age he was seventeen, but he looked more. He was large for his years, but, since he was well proportioned, the fact was not immediately apparent. What did strike you at once were good looks, good health and an air of well-being. The pleasing impression made by the boy’s features was, however, somewhat marred by an expression of self-satisfaction, and it may be that the straight, well-knit figure carried itself with an air of surety that was almost complacent. So, at least, thought one who witnessed Myron’s descent from the New York train that September afternoon. “There’s a promising-looking chap,” said Jud Mellen, “but he somehow gives you the impression that he’s bought Warne and has come down to look the town over.” Harry Cater laughed as he picked his trunk check from a handful of coins. “Lots of ’em look that way when they first arrive, Jud. I’m not sure you didn’t yourself,” he added slyly. “If I did, I soon got over it.” The football captain smiled drily, his gaze following the subject of their remarks. “Just as I suspected,” he continued. “It’s a taxi for his. Four blocks is too far for the poor frail lad.” “Oh, come, Jud, be fair. Maybe he doesn’t know whether the school’s four blocks or forty. Besides, he’s much too beautifully got up to tramp it. He might get dust on that corking suit of his.” “It is rather a good-looking outfit, and that’s a fact. Maybe if I was dolled up like that I’d want to ride, too. Well, come on, Katie, and let’s get up there. Practice is at three, and you’ve got only about forty minutes to find yourself in.” Harry Cater, or “Katie,” as he was known at Parkinson School, had been more charitable than correct in assuming that the new boy was uncertain of the distance between station and school, for the catalogue had definitely said four blocks. But had the distance been two short blocks instead of four long ones it is unlikely that Myron Foster would have walked.
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